Oxfam in West Africa
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Ghana: Enhancing Livelihoods through Climate Change Adaptation Learning Project : Changing and affecting lives positively

October 29th, 2013 Posted in English, Ghana, Livelihoods
“ Now I use an energy saving stove which is more efficient, hygienic and faster in cooking.” Lamisi Sandow from Sumnibomah in the East Mamprusi District

“ Now I use an energy saving stove which is more efficient, hygienic and faster in cooking.”    Lamisi Sandow from Sumnibomah in the East Mamprusi District

“Providing for the household for the rest of the year after consuming our farm produce became increasingly difficult and had to fall on the selling of shea nuts and fire wood” said Lamisi Sandow from Sumnibomah in the East Mamprusi District,married with six children and a sick husband to cater for.

Like many other women in her community Lamisi was using the traditional three-stone structure for cooking which according to her was time consuming and fuel demanding because I did not have enough time to pick shea nuts, my elder daughter did not go to school as she had to go and pick shea nuts while I looked for firewood and worked on the farm”.

Thanks to the ELCAP project, Lamisi saidNow I use an energy saving stove which is more efficient, hygienic and faster in cooking. With the energy saving stove unconventional fuel materials such as corn husk, and other waste materials can be used with little wood.

Lamisi was among the 60 women in 3 communities who were trained and supported by Oxfam to construct energy saving stoves for 324 households. As at June 2013, she has constructed ninety four (94) stoves for women in Sumnibomah and for women in her neighbouring communities, Zambuligu and Zarantinga which is generating additional income as the women show appreciation by giving her money or food ingredients.

The whole idea of ELCAP is to affect lives positively through training and skill acquisition. The project since its inception a year and half ago has been able to offer various forms of assistance to fifteen communities in the three northern regions of Ghana with 3000 small-holder women and men farmers of whom 2100 are women.

So far, beneficiaries of the project have been introduced to environmental friendly agricultural practices that have boosted soil fertility while over 200 men and women are undertaking dry season gardening to generate income during lean season.

Beneficiary communities have been educated on agricultural practices such as soil conservation activities, protection of shea trees, awareness creation on anti bush burning laws and natural resource management

Through this awareness creation 13 ‘anti-bush fire squads’ comprising of 150 men and 99 women volunteers in 6 communities were able to prevent and manage bushfires. At least 21 bushfires were put out by these volunteers in the dry season.

ELCAP understands that if small holder farmers in the three northern regions and other predominant farming communities are continually given such support, they will be empowered to enhance agricultural production as well as improve their livelihoods in the face of changing climate.

 Naana Nkansah Agyekum
Media and Communications Officer
email: nagyekum@oxfam.org.uk

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