Great new 110 page guide to humanitarian campaigning

Duncan Green - July 6, 2016

Just been browsing through a brilliant new Oxfam guide to humanitarian campaigning. A treasure trove of 110 pages crammed full of wisdom, experience and 32 case studies on everything from addressing tribal conflicts in Pakistan to gender responsive work with Syrian refugees to influencing Australia’s humanitarian policy. And no sign of an executive summary. Sigh. To be fair, it would be very hard to summarize, …

Continue reading

Want to empower women? Digital Financial Services are the way to go!

Duncan Green - July 5, 2016

Sophie Romana (left) and Shelley Spencer (right) report back from the June 8 high level roundtable organized by NetHope and USAID, which brought together mobile banking and gender champions to reflect on how Digital Financial Services (“DFS”) can galvanize women’s empowerment. Women’s empowerment is often measured by their access to resources and ability to make decisions over how they are used.  Recent evidence shows that DFS delivered …

Continue reading

Links I Liked

Duncan Green - July 4, 2016

The whole Fragile States discussion came a lot closer to home last week (power vacuums, formal v informal power, unstable leadership, fragmented patronage-based party systems, even the role of elite boarding schools……). Why oh why did the Remain campaign reject this poster? We deserve an answer. As a public service, Buzzfeed has pulled together all the best Brexit tweets of the last week. They are …

Continue reading

Book Review: Eden 2.0: Climate Change and the Search for a 21st Century Myth, by Alex Evans

Duncan Green - July 1, 2016

In his new book, Eden 2.0 (just 68 pages, published today, but currently only available on Kindle, which is bad news for technophobes and tree killers like me, or people who dislike Amazon), Alex Evans asks a question that has been uppermost in every Remainer’s mind in recent days ‘if evidence and rational arguments aren’t enough, then what is?’ He is talking about climate change, …

Continue reading

What’s the likely impact of Brexit on development, aid and Oxfam? Any opportunities amid the gloom?

Duncan Green - June 30, 2016

Following on Tuesday’s retrospective ‘how did this happen?’ piece, some thoughts on the future, starting wide (development in general) then narrowing down to the aid business, and all the way to Oxfam/INGOs. All highly tentative, subject to correction etc in the coming days. One big assumption: I’m assuming that Brexit actually goes ahead. And one pleasant surprise – there are a few opportunities as well …

Continue reading

If you want to organize an event on How Change Happens this autumn, please let me know

Duncan Green - June 29, 2016

My new book, How Change Happens, is published in October by OUP. I know, I know, there is no sight so craven or humiliating as a writer desperate to promote their book. Any better ideas? The academic summer break is approaching fast, so as a first step, we’re inviting expressions of interest from universities, NGOs or anyone else in being part of the launch. The …

Continue reading

What does ‘How Change Happens’ thinking tell us about Brexit?

Duncan Green - June 28, 2016

I was in Lisbon running a ‘How Change Happens’ summer school when the Brexit news came in, so I thought I’d apply an HCH analysis to a seismic event. I’m not an expert on UK politics, so this is bound to be pretty uninformed compared to the avalanche of post mortems in the press, but let’s see where it goes. First up a disclaimer. As Timothy …

Continue reading

Links I Liked

Duncan Green - June 27, 2016

Blimey, where to start? Think I’ll do an initial ‘how change happens’ post mortem piece on Brexit tomorrow, and just stick to the pre-poll run-up today, because the final days of the EU referendum campaign produced some fine humour – it already seems like a bygone age. Rhodri Marsden belatedly took a leaf out of the Leave campaign’s approach to factiness. And should his political fortunes prosper, let’s …

Continue reading

Will Bill Gates’ chickens end African poverty?

Duncan Green - June 23, 2016

  Joseph Hanlon and Teresa Smart are unimpressed by a new initiative, but disappointingly avoid all the potential excruciating puns Bill Gates announced on 7 June that he is giving 100,000 chickens to the poor because chickens are “easy to take care of” and a woman with just five hens in Africa can make $1000 per year. For Mozambique where we work, this is remarkable …

Continue reading
02192
Translate »